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Events & Culture

Events & Culture

5 Reasons why blah blah something


1) Memory – Studies have shown that eating breakfast improves your cognitive brain function and your memory. Heading to class on an empty stomach might not seem like that big of a deal, but if you’re trying to memorize the skeletal system of the upper extremities or cite instances of allegory in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, give yourself a fighting chance and eat something!

2) Heart – Skipping breakfast is attributed to higher levels of cholesterol, LDL, and insulin in adults – all symptoms that can lead to heart disease and diabetes. By eating breakfast, you’re regulating your blood sugar after a long period of not eating. If you aim to “break the fast” with a healthy meal, you keep your blood sugar at a stable level, avoiding a sugar high and the crash that comes with it – not to mention the health problems later down the road.

3) Concentration –When you’re feeling particularly unfocused, take a minute to review how your nutrition has been lately. A well balanced diet, starting with breakfast, can improve your concentration. There are enough distractions on campus already. Eating with improved concentration in mind will help you get a leg up during times of stress (so, most weeks of school).

4) Energy – You need energy to function and energy comes from food. “Well, what about coffee?” you may ask. While coffee might be a quick fix to help you stay awake, it isn’t the kind of fuel your body needs for prolonged and sufficient energy. Besides, caffeine can make you feel anxious and or hyper – not the kind of energy you were hoping for before settling into that 90 minute lecture.

5) Impulse Control – Studies have shown that a well-rounded breakfast helps with impulse control later in the day. When you start the day right, you have the energy you need to sustain yourself, therefore you’re less likely to go for cinnamon buns, Starbucks pastries, or any of the other junk around campus. When you skip breakfast, it’s like going to the grocery store on an empty stomach; you’re bound to make impulse buys based on the biological need to satisfy your hungry. Set yourself up for success, not failure, by nibbling on a high protein, high fiber snack at the very least.

Close up of an abstract painting

Artworks

SAMU’s Artworks Program consists of several arts-related initiatives, including the student art gallery, Gray Gallery, and an artwork rental fundraiser, known as Grayworks.

SAMU staff providing students with information on sustainability

Eco samu

The Eco-SAMU Program aims to help create an ecological culture that educates, motivates, and empowers students to create and maintain the commitment to sustaining our campus and community climate.

Band members warming up for the Fall Fest concert

Events calendar

Not sure what’s happening this month? Take a look at our Events Calendar and see if there’s anything that catches your eye. 

a stack of past issues of the griff student magazine

the griff

SAMU’s student-run monthly magazine.  

SAMU Programs aim to provide students with activities and opportunities to learn about wellbeing, as well as raising awareness about various resources available to students, both in and outside the MacEwan community.

Our mission is to provide ongoing and one-off programming with the direct aim to improve the long-term wellbeing of MacEwan students and their community.

SAMU Programs consist of the Student Refugee Program (SRP), StressLess, Sustainability, SAMU Cares, and Artworks. SAMU Programs also runs a variety of other programming and interactive campaigns, blog posts, hands out wellness bags, and organizes activities that fall under two umbrellas of focus – Wellbeing and Community.

Please note, all SAMU programming is subject to change as we respond to updates and guidelines for COVID-19.

Programs Manager
norteym@macewan.ca

Community Assistant
SAcommunity@macewan.ca

Wellbeing Assistant
SAwellbeing@macewan.ca

Stress is a common and normal issue for a student to experience. It can be the result of any number of problems.

Signs of stress can be physical, emotional, or behavioural. Some common symptoms of feeling stressed include:

Sleep problems
Irritability
Headaches
Anxiety
Indecisiveness
Stress is the result of an imbalance between demands and coping strategies. When the demands placed on us are greater than our ability to cope with them, we experience stress.

The key to handling stress is to regain balance by increasing our coping strategies to deal with the demands. When we look at coping, we want to be doing things that are both external and internal. It is essential to develop a strong social system, break up your routine, take care of your body, and ask for help when needed.

Stress is a common and normal issue for a student to experience. It can be the result of any number of problems.

Signs of stress can be physical, emotional, or behavioural. Some common symptoms of feeling stressed include:

Sleep problems
Irritability
Headaches
Anxiety
Indecisiveness
Stress is the result of an imbalance between demands and coping strategies. When the demands placed on us are greater than our ability to cope with them, we experience stress.

The key to handling stress is to regain balance by increasing our coping strategies to deal with the demands. When we look at coping, we want to be doing things that are both external and internal. It is essential to develop a strong social system, break up your routine, take care of your body, and ask for help when needed.

Stress is a common and normal issue for a student to experience. It can be the result of any number of problems.

Signs of stress can be physical, emotional, or behavioural. Some common symptoms of feeling stressed include:

Sleep problems
Irritability
Headaches
Anxiety
Indecisiveness
Stress is the result of an imbalance between demands and coping strategies. When the demands placed on us are greater than our ability to cope with them, we experience stress.

The key to handling stress is to regain balance by increasing our coping strategies to deal with the demands. When we look at coping, we want to be doing things that are both external and internal. It is essential to develop a strong social system, break up your routine, take care of your body, and ask for help when needed.

Stress is a common and normal issue for a student to experience. It can be the result of any number of problems.

Signs of stress can be physical, emotional, or behavioural. Some common symptoms of feeling stressed include:

Sleep problems
Irritability
Headaches
Anxiety
Indecisiveness
Stress is the result of an imbalance between demands and coping strategies. When the demands placed on us are greater than our ability to cope with them, we experience stress.

The key to handling stress is to regain balance by increasing our coping strategies to deal with the demands. When we look at coping, we want to be doing things that are both external and internal. It is essential to develop a strong social system, break up your routine, take care of your body, and ask for help when needed.

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Jane Smith | Third Year, Political Science

Student Refugee Program

Each term, $2.50 of your student fees goes towards supporting SAMU’s Student Refugee Program (SRP). Working with World University Service of Canada (WUSC), SRP funds the tuition and housing of a refugee student for four years. With the help of a local committee group made up of students and staff, SAMU ensures all the sponsored student’s needs are met throughout their time at MacEwan.

Questions? Email norteym@macewan.ca

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Questions? Email norteym@macewan.ca

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